Crime Scene Cleanup >> Biohazard Cleanup

Biohazard Cleanup is definitely a unique and different job than most others. Not too many people, say that, that’s what they want to do when they grow up. But it can be a very challenging and rewarding job for the people that like to help make a difference. It takes a special person, to be able to work with a homicide, suicide or violent crime and restore a person’s home or business back to its original state. It can be very dangerous working around different biohazards.
1.Biohazard Cleanup is a fairly new occupation, it wasn’t all that long ago that the family would have to figure out how to clean up the crime scene themselves. Without the training a person trying to perform a crime scene cleanup themselves, could expose themselves to infectious disease from blood-borne pathogens. Not that crime is new, it’s been around since the beginning of time, but finally, the administrative authority decided that it might not be safe for a person without training to attempt a crime scene cleanup themselves.
2.In order to have a career in Biohazard Cleanup, a person must possess some rare and unique qualities, of course a strong stomach is a must. Dealing with some horrific and grotesque situations, handling body parts and body fluids, sometimes it’s like straight out of a horror movie. But at the same time having a tender side dealing with the family that has just been shocked and completely beside themselves with grief.
3.People that perform Biohazard Cleanup, are on call around the clock, seems like most cleanups happen at the least opportune times. The cleanup technicians have to be ready to go at a moments notice as soon as the scene has been released by the proper authorities. Some of these technicians have had some other training as either an emergency medical technician, a policeman, and sometimes a cleaning professional
4.You can get information from the ABRA, that stands for the American Bio Recovery Association, they are an international nonprofit organization for professionals in Biohazard Cleanup. The organization strives for its members to have the highest technical and educational guidelines in the industry of biohazard. Training is also available through the organization along with a customer directory. They have a network of people that you can join in with in the biohazard industry to learn techniques about different crime scenes.
5.There is no formal training to become a Biohazard Cleanup technicians, there are classes you can take about blood-borne pathogens, or learning the latest cleaning techniques. The United States federal OSHA has regulations when dealing with human blood and body fluids and the procedure to dispose of them. A technician would also need to have their hepatitis B vaccine because some crime scenes there is a potential for coming into contact with drug use needles.

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Crawl Space Drying >> Water Restoration

I’ve been a local Water Restoration for 17 years and in the area of the country that I work there are many mobile homes and many prefab houses that have crawlspaces. I have seen every kind of water damage from a burst pipe, to a leaking condensation line and leaking water heaters. I have seen minor cases and I have seen complete floods. I will go over the steps to try to give you an idea of the kind of work that I do on a normal Water Restoration days job.
1.Let’s talk about the pipe burst jobs, there are many kinds of pipes that were used on mobile homes and prefabricated houses. On the older homes they used to use galvanized pipes, the problem was that it wasn’t a case of if it will leak, but when it will leak. All galvanized pipes will leak at some point or another, some of these leaks were just little trickles or drips that eventually accumulated into a lot of Water Restoration and some of them were geysers that a good sized chunk of the steel pipe broke loose sending gallons upon gallons of water into the crawlspace. In order to gain access, we had to take all of the skirting off of the mobile home, removed any water damaged insulation and began to Water Restoration the entire area using big air moving fans.
2.Once the area was thoroughly dried we treated any mold and mildew, sometimes we would have to use special antifungal products because the mold was to well-established. We had to replace any damaged wood that was on the floor of the home, sometimes these mobile home manufacturers will use high density fiber board. If any water gets on this wood it will cause it to swell up, warp and start to disintegrate by separating the layers of wood.
3.We also check the supports if there is enough water movement it will wash away the soil leaving an area under the home vulnerable from not having any bracing. In some cases of Water Restoration the actual metal framing begins to rust, these homes were not constructed to ever withstand water damage from the crawlspace area. The metal is usually not treated with paint or any other protective measure and they will begin to rust. If left unrestored they will continue to rust weakening the structural integrity of the homes frame.
4.We checked all of the homes systems like the plumbing to make sure that whatever the piping is braced to is still structurally sound, we check the flooring under the water heater to make sure that there is no water damage and that the floor could still hold up the weight of the heater. We check the heating and air-conditioning unit to make sure that the bracing for it has not been jeopardized in any way. We also look for any electrical issues like wires that are exposed that could’ve gotten wet from the Water Restoration.

Crawl Space Drying >> Water Restoration

I’ve been a local Water Restoration for 17 years and in the area of the country that I work there are many mobile homes and many prefab houses that have crawlspaces. I have seen every kind of water damage from a burst pipe, to a leaking condensation line and leaking water heaters. I have seen minor cases and I have seen complete floods. I will go over the steps to try to give you an idea of the kind of work that I do on a normal Water Restoration days job.
1.Let’s talk about the pipe burst jobs, there are many kinds of pipes that were used on mobile homes and prefabricated houses. On the older homes they used to use galvanized pipes, the problem was that it wasn’t a case of if it will leak, but when it will leak. All galvanized pipes will leak at some point or another, some of these leaks were just little trickles or drips that eventually accumulated into a lot of Water Restoration and some of them were geysers that a good sized chunk of the steel pipe broke loose sending gallons upon gallons of water into the crawlspace. In order to gain access, we had to take all of the skirting off of the mobile home, removed any water damaged insulation and began to Water Restoration the entire area using big air moving fans.
2.Once the area was thoroughly dried we treated any mold and mildew, sometimes we would have to use special antifungal products because the mold was to well-established. We had to replace any damaged wood that was on the floor of the home, sometimes these mobile home manufacturers will use high density fiber board. If any water gets on this wood it will cause it to swell up, warp and start to disintegrate by separating the layers of wood.
3.We also check the supports if there is enough water movement it will wash away the soil leaving an area under the home vulnerable from not having any bracing. In some cases of Water Restoration the actual metal framing begins to rust, these homes were not constructed to ever withstand water damage from the crawlspace area. The metal is usually not treated with paint or any other protective measure and they will begin to rust. If left unrestored they will continue to rust weakening the structural integrity of the homes frame.
4.We checked all of the homes systems like the plumbing to make sure that whatever the piping is braced to is still structurally sound, we check the flooring under the water heater to make sure that there is no water damage and that the floor could still hold up the weight of the heater. We check the heating and air-conditioning unit to make sure that the bracing for it has not been jeopardized in any way. We also look for any electrical issues like wires that are exposed that could’ve gotten wet from the Water Restoration.

http://safedryrestoration.com/d/40/Water%20Restoration/

Water Removal

Most of our building codes require the use of crawlspace vents to help in removing moisture from the ME. But, many home construction professionals are now realizing that an unvented crawlspace or a closed crawlspace vents only after the crawlspace has had a chance to dry out after the initial construction is the best…

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Crawl Space Drying >> Water Mitigation

Insulation is one of the most important parts of trying to keep your Water Mitigation. Here are some useful tips, always install rigid or insulation that comes in batts using one of three different methods either use exterior foam, interior foam, or interior batt to create complete insulation coverage. Be sure to insulate the band joist with batt insulation, and possibly the most importantly insulate the crawlspace access if it is located in the exterior wall.
1.Install a one-piece termite shield between your band joist and the masonry Water Mitigation foundation wall that will cover the wall insulation and will also extend completely outside, or leave at least a 2- to 4-inch insulation gap at the top for later termite inspection. Install an air supply outlet in the crawlspace, depending on the leakiness of the floor to provide a good return air path. During the early steps of your home’s construction, meet with your mechanical subcontractors, the plumbing, electrical, and heating/cooling contractors to remind them of the importance of keeping this between the floor joists as clear as possible.
2.Run your Water Mitigation plumbing drain lines, the electrical wiring, and the heating and air ductwork below the bottom of the insulation so that an endless layer of insulation could be installed. For added protection against freezing, supply plumbing could be installed within the insulation. The best method is to run your water supply plumbing together in a few joist cavities. The insulation could be split and run around your plumbing piping, seal any air leaks between the conditioned space of your home and the Water Mitigation. These high-priority air leaks will include the holes around your bathtub drains and other plumbing drain lines, plenums for air ductwork.
3.Take the other penetrations like for your electrical wiring, plumbing, and ductwork including the duct boot connections at your floor. Select the correct insulation levels of batts with an attached vapor/moisture barrier that are usually used to insulate your framed floors. Get the insulation with the proper width for the correct joist spacing of the floor being insulated. Complete insulation coverage is imperative, do not leave any Water Mitigation insulation voids. The batts must be installed up against the subfloor to remove any gaps that may act as passageways for cold air to flow between the insulation and the subfloor.
The batts need to be cut to the full length of the floor joist being insulated and cut to fit around your wiring and plumbing. Insulate around the band joist area and between the air ducts and your sub floor as the space permits. Use the correct insulation hangers or wire staves that are spaced every 12-18 inches to hold up the floor insulation in place without squeezing the insulation more than 1 inch. The location of the Water Mitigation vapor barrier will depend on your home’s location. In most parts of the country, the vapor/moisture barrier should face upward. Although, in certain areas of the Gulf states and other regions with mild winters and hot summers, it.

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Crawl Space Drying >> Water Extraction

By conditioning our crawl spaces this may make them perform better than just a vented crawl space in the terms of safety, health, comfort, durability and energy consumption. When we condition our crawl spaces, they do not cost more to build than a vented Water Extraction. Your existing vented crawl spaces are experiencing extreme moisture and mold problems and are costing builder’s and homeowners a significant amount of money to repair.
1.Despite the apparent problems with the usual vented crawl spaces and the apparent benefits of conditioned Water Extraction there is not a noticeable trend towards the building of conditioned crawlspaces. One of the reasons generally cited by builders and planners is the code does not let me build unvented crawl spaces. This is both typically correct and misleading, the codes do not let the construction of “unvented” crawl spaces, except in some limited conditions, but they will accept the construction of “conditioned” crawl spaces. The distinction is very important and absolutely necessary. Water Extraction is typically looked that as a good practice despite the apparent moisture problems that happen when the outside air with a dew point higher than inside of the crawl space surface temperature is allowed to enter a crawl space.
2.An unvented, conditioned crawl space with insulation around the perimeter will solve this problem. Unvented, conditioned Water Extraction with insulation around the perimeter will perform better in the terms of safety, health and also pest control. Comfort because it warms the floors, more uniform temperatures, and better durability at resisting moisture. The energy consumption is better than passively vented crawl spaces with its sub floor insulation. Using perimeter insulation rather than in the floor insulation performs so much better in all different climates from an energy conservation standpoint.
3.The crawl space temperatures, dew points and humidity track that of the interior of the house. Water Extraction insulated around the perimeter are warmer and much drier than crawl spaces that are just insulated between the crawl space and the house. Cold surfaces that might condense moisture are minimized when you’re crawl spaces are conditioned. Crawl spaces ought to be designed and built as mini-basements, as part of the rest of the house, within the conditioned space. They ought to be insulated around their perimeters and also should have a never-ending sealed ground cover like taped polyethylene.
4.They ought to have a perimeter drainage system just like a regular basement, especially when the Water Extraction ground level is below the ground level of the surrounding grade. Our crawl spaces should also be designed and built to be dry. A dry crawl space is by far less likely to have pests and termites and the growth of mold. A dry crawl space is safer and healthier than a damp crawl space. Crawl spaces have to control the rainwater, groundwater and provide good drainage for any potential plumbing leaks or flooding incidents. Water Extraction have to always be a drying mechanism.

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Crawl Space Drying >> Structural Drying

For many years, the standard building practice has always been to insulate the underneath of your floor over a ventilated, unconditioned Structural Drying. A better method is to construct a well sealed, unventilated crawlspace, in other words build the crawlspace like a regular basement by sealing and insulating your foundation walls rather than your house’s subfloor. The advantages to insulating the exterior crawlspace walls are avoiding the problems associated with ventilating the crawlspace.
1.There will be less insulation that is required, around 400 square feet for a 1,000-square-foot Structural Drying with 3-foot high walls. Your plumbing piping and HVAC ductwork are all within the conditioned area of your house so they will not require any additional insulation for energy efficiency or protection against freezing. By air sealing between your home and the crawlspace is less critical. The disadvantages to insulating the Structural Drying walls are, the insulation could be damaged by rodents, pests, or water. Install some drainage plane material or gravel up against the exterior home’s foundation wall to relieve any hydrostatic pressure and channel the rain water to the foundation’s exterior drain.
2.Provide a foundation drainage system around the exterior at the bottom of the footing and not on top, when the foundation floor when the inside grade is below the outside ground level. Take and surround a perforated 4-inch drain pipe with half-inch gravel and cover it with filter fabric. Then install 6-mil polyethylene plastic across the Structural Drying floor to prevent any soil moisture from seeping back into the crawlspace. Overlap and seal all of the seams by at least 12 inches, and tape the polyethylene about 6 inches up the crawlspace walls. A radon remediation system will need ventilation in the crawlspace to the outside of your home.
3.By not planning for a radon-resistant construction could necessitate the air sealing the of the floor in order to remove the radon through normal ventilation. The Structural Drying needs to be built airtight and the air barrier has to be maintained. An access door to the crawlspace needs to be positioned inside your home through the inside subfloor unless an airtight, waterproof, insulated access door in the exterior wall is built and maintained. Go over all of your plans for this type of foundation insulation with your pest control and local building code officials to make sure you abide by all code compliance.
4.Eliminate or seal your foundation vents, make sure that your combustion furnace and your water heater that is located in the crawlspace are sealed against combustion and equipped with an external powered combustion system. Seal all of the air leaks through the outside wall during and after the homebuilding, including the band joist. Position the [ ME] access door inside your home or install an access door through the exterior that will remain airtight after repeated use. Select the insulation levels to coincide with the International Energy Conservation Code or the DOE Insulation Fact Sheet. This Insulation Fact Sheet (DOE/CE-0180) could be ordered from the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Clearinghouse or accessed from the Internet.

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Crawl Space Drying >> Storm Damage

If you own a mobile home in an area that has extreme thunderstorms with high winds you know the likelihood of the skirting around your home coming loose and blowing off. This will of course leave your crawlspace open to the elements and being vulnerable to Storm Damage. There are many people that face this kind of damage every year in Florida and other parts of the country where they have hurricanes with heavy winds and extreme amounts of rain.
1. Every hurricane season thousands of homes are affected, sometimes windows are broken and the rain comes in soaking everything in that room and running through the floor causing Storm Damage. When this water damage occurs the things that usually are affected are the installation that is in the floor. If insulation gets wet it is usually destroyed it will need to be replaced. In your crawlspace this job can be very difficult, there’s not a whole lot of room to work. Taking out the old insulation is a dirty nasty Storm Damage job, you wouldn’t think that years of dust would collect in the insulation but it does.
2.In order to pull out the old insulation usually you must be right underneath of it in the dust in the insulation fibers will fall down into your eyes if you’re not wearing any protection. The old insulation that was made of fiberglass and was very itchy, the little fiberglass particles become airborne and if it lands on or in your clothes it’s a scratching Storm Damage nightmare. When pulling out the insulation you have to be careful, sometimes the insulation might be attached to things like plumbing or electrical wires.
3.Once all of the old insulation has been removed, the new insulation must be cut and fitted into place to give you the maximum insulating benefit. Another concern, is the supports that are holding up your home, you must evaluate how these supports were installed to begin with. Are the supports on any kind of foundation or slab of concrete or are they merely set upon the ground. Sometimes the crew that initially sets up your house will place some sort of movable pad under the supports. If the supports do not have any kind of slab or bracing underneath of them, what is the condition of the soil, has the Storm Damage washed the dirt away? This would basically mean that there is no support and you would have to figure out the best way of reinstalling that support.
4.Has the Storm Damage damaged the flexible ducting that is under your home to supply the air for your heating/cooling system. You may want to get a reputable heating and air company to do an energy audit. How they do this is they will crawl underneath of your home and check for leaks at the places where the ducting is joined together along with that will cover all of the areas of the ducting to see if there are any tears or puncture holes caused by the Storm Damage.

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Crawl Space Drying >> Radon Mitigation

One of the more efficient ways to provide a drying mechanism to a Radon Mitigation is to condition a crawl space by the use of heating and cooling and the crawl space as if the crawl space is just another part of the home. Crawl spaces need to always have a good ground cover that will prevent evaporation from any ground moisture into the crawl space. There are a lot of ways to provide a strong ground cover or liner. Most effective is 6 mil sheet polyethylene that has been taped to the crawl space walls.
1.This ground cover needs to be a continuous piece through the piers and supports, also the crawl space perimeter walls should be insulated. When insulating the inside of the Radon Mitigation, just like a basement, it is very important not to leave any concrete or masonry exposed in order to control the condensation. It is also necessary to control and condensation at the rim joist locations. This is usually best done when using the rigid type insulation installed either on the outside of the rim joist or inside against the rim joist. A thoroughly sealed, moisture-protected, and completely insulated crawlspace will increase your comfort, save you money on your energy costs, improve the overall durability of your home.
2.This will help reduce the entry of moisture, radon, and other potential hazardous irritants or pollutants into your home. Whichever method you follow, the keys to an effective Radon Mitigation are of course moisture control by using a water resistant foundation system to drain the rainwater and keep the groundwater away from your foundations. Having and airtight construction that is sealing all of the air leaks between the conditioned crawlspace area and the outside before the insulation installation. Entire insulation coverage by properly installing the proper insulation levels and making sure that the insulation coverage is one piece and complete.
3.A Radon Mitigation is always susceptible to moisture and other deterioration problems because of the constant contact with the earth. The best practices for preventing these moisture problems will depend on your local climate and style of your construction, but the following rules apply to almost every crawlspace design. First keep all untreated wood building materials away from the ground. Second provide a rain drainage system and Radon Mitigation, like gutters, to take the rainwater away from your house. Third make sure to slope the ground away from your house for at least 5 feet at the very minimum with a 5% grade, in other words 3 inches in a 5 feet distance.
4.Create drainage channels to direct the rainwater around your house. Fourth add a sill gasket to provide maximum air sealing. Put in a protective membrane, like an EPDM-type protective membrane, to help as a capillary break that will reduce by wicking of the water from the masonry wall. This waterproof membrane, in addition to your metal flashing, will serve as a termite protecting shield. Damp proof the below-grade area of your home’s foundation wall to prevent the outside wall from absorbing any ground moisture by Radon Mitigation.

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Crawl Space Drying >> Mold Remediation

Living in a home that has a crawlspace is fine there are thousands of houses across the United States that are built above the ground for whatever reason and have crawlspaces. Along with the many responsibilities of being a homeowner the crawlspace should be checked periodically, maybe mark it on your calendar once a month, once every three months, at least once every six months. And part of your regular inspection should be looking for damp areas or water leaks that could cause Mold Remediation.
1.Too often people buy homes and they think that they can just take care of themselves, they don’t understand that there is preventative maintenance and there are things in your house that can fail and cause damage. One of the most common things in the respects of crawlspaces they can go unnoticed for weeks, months, and sometimes years are water leaks. Most of the time your home is built with the water pipes and the drain pipes in the floor. If these pipes leak, guess where the water goes causing Mold Remediation.
2.If your home was built prior to 1970 there is a good chance that your water pipes are made of a galvanized steel. This was the material that they had before copper, it was the best that they had at that time. Unfortunately galvanized pipe will corrode from the inside out, eventually leaking and causing Mold Remediation. Most of the time the leak would start by just seeping and dripping. If your pipes are under the floor, in your crawlspace the water would go underneath and you might not know about it for some time.
3.If you live in a mobile home or a prefabricated home that was built between the 1960s and the 1990s chances are there was a material called poly pipe. It was a plastic pipe, usually gray in color sometimes they used brass fittings that most of the time the fittings were plastic. If the leak came from the pipe itself it would usually burst causing a lot of Mold Remediation. But if the leak occurred on a plastic fitting it could just drip for long periods of time without any evidence until you start to smell something musty giving the indication of mold.
4.Another thing to keep an eye on is your water heater, many times a water heater could be seeping. And because water always follows the path of least resistance, and there are places in the floor of your home that the water to leak through the water will end up going into your crawlspace causing a Mold Remediation. Another point of concern is the condensation line that comes from the air conditioner, this pipe is usually made out of PVC and sometimes it will crack from either old-age or is damaged from something hitting it. Some crawlspaces are very difficult to get into sometimes they heating/air-conditioning duct work will meander through this opening making it very difficult to make a proper Mold Remediation inspection.

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Crawlspace Water Damage

You may not be aware how critical it is to have your crawlspace dry and free of moisture. All kinds of health issues can arise from having a crawlspace with the potential of being wet and having the possibility of growing mold. Ear, nose and throat problems, lung infections, asthma and other infections can…

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